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Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner candidates

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Five candidates who hope to become the Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) are standing for election on Thursday 6th May.

They are the incumbent Katy Bourne (Conservative) and four challengers – Jamie Bennett (Liberal Democrat), Kahina Bouhassane (Green), Paul Richards (Labour and Co-operative) and Roy Williams (Independent).

Each candidate was sent the same dozen questions (which were submitted by community groups and voters from across Sussex).

Click on the candidates name (above) to see their responses.

On the same day elections will also be taking place to elect Councillors representing Crowborough on East Sussex County Council.


Voting

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The election was originally due to take place in May 2020, but was postponed owing to the Covid-19 pandemic. There are 41 Police and Crime Commissioners in England and Wales, who are elected to make sure the police are run properly. There is no elected PCC for London.

This will be the third time elections had been held.

Police and Crime Commissioner elections use the Supplementary Vote system. Voters can choose their first and second choice.

The ballot paper has two columns for marking your first choice and second choice (optional).

In the first column, you mark a cross [X] next to the candidate who is your first choice. For your vote to be counted, you need to cast a first choice vote.

In the second column, you can mark a cross next to the candidate who is your second choice. You don’t have to mark a second choice.

The PCC votes will be counted on Monday 10th May.

Jamie Bennett (Liberal Democrat)

Jamie Bennett Liberal Democrat candidate for Police and Crime Commissioner

Why do you want to be the police and crime commissioner for Sussex?

Sussex Police has been let down by the Conservatives for the past nine years, with budgets being cut and officer numbers decreasing.

I want to help repair this situation until the government realise the PCC role is not fit for purpose and scraps the position making the police independent from politics once again.

What will you bring to the role?

I will work hard for the community I serve and not just follow direction from the government or a political party.

Our police need the freedom to work for the community and not be used as a party political chess piece.

What is it that a commissioner can do that a Police and Crime Panel can’t – and does the extra cost incurred by the office of the PCC provide value for money?

No, the PCC role should not have been introduced by the government and the Police and Crime Panel would be a much better and cheaper use of the police budget.

Should PCCs serve only two terms, like American presidents? What grounds are there for serving more than two terms as PCC?

I believe the role should be scrapped but if the government can’t see the errors in the role, then yes, I believe eight years (two terms) should be a maximum.

What would you say to those migrants, refugees and people from black, Asian and other ethnic minority communities who are wary of the police? How would you respond to concerns that stop and search affects some communities disproportionately?

Unfortunately, this is an issue nationally and needs urgent action. No one should be wary of the police and I will work with all community groups and the police to bridge the gap and ensure all members of our innocent community feel comfortable contacting the police.

Vigils for Sarah Everard and protests by Extinction Rebellion and the Black Lives Matter movement have ended with riot police dragging people away while the English Defence League and other far-right groups are handled with kid gloves. How would you balance responses to different protests?

We all have the right to protest and the police need to treat all protests with the same force unless there is intelligence which would require a further response.

I believe the Extinction Rebellion, Black Lives Matter and Kill the Bill protests have been unfairly managed by the police.

How will you ensure that women and girls are safe from male violence and abuse in their schools, on the streets and in their homes?

More police are needed to engage and reassure people. Since 2010 police numbers have decreased by over 15 per cent, according to the ONS (Office for National Statistics), with less police officers and more crime.

The service is stretched and unable to provide a prevention service in schools, etc.

How will you work with Sussex Police to learn from cases like Shana Grice’s murder, making sure officers are trained and women are taken seriously when they report crimes.

It’s vital that all Sussex Police staff are fully trained and in order to do this we need to invest the money in the personal development of all our officers and as I have said many times increase the numbers of officers in order to do this.

How do we get the police to work with councils, to patrol where and at the times we want them to?

As stated in answer five, we need more police, and they need to work with all local councils instead of just reacting to events.

I have been a councillor for over 11 years and have seen a large decrease in police and council engagement.

Councillors know the areas better than most people and can provide so much intelligence.

How do you think Sussex Police can balance the policing needs of its busy urban areas without neglecting country villages?

Increase the police numbers for a start – a 15 per cent decrease in 11 years with crimes increasing is a complete dereliction of duty by the PCC.

How committed are you to ensuring that the police enforce the 2004 Hunting Act?

This is a law that the police don’t have time to enforce because they don’t have the resources but they need to crack down on it.

Hunting is illegal and needs to be stopped. Would the police ignore drink driving in the same way they ignore the Hunting Act law?

How will you tackle drug-related crime?

Drugs are a serious issue within our community but I believe the government needs to look at the current drug classifications and the actions police are allowed to take. This includes the sentencing for drug crimes as people are not scared about being caught at the moment.

For more information


Facebook: www.facebook.com/jamiebennettArun
Twitter: @jamieben120689

Kahina Bouhassane (Green candidate)

Kahina Bouhassane, Green Party Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner candidate

Why do you want to be the police and crime commissioner for Sussex?

Despite the hard work of many officers, policing is broken in Sussex. Over 10 years of Tory leadership and austerity has left a system that is not working. Crimes are going uninvestigated and it’s our local community that suffers.

I want to speak up for people who aren’t being heard. The system is catastrophically unfair for Sussex’s rural communities and black and minority ethnic groups and it leaves women and those identifying with other marginalised genders vulnerable.

I’m committed to making Sussex Police a police for the people.

What will you bring to the role?

I’ve got personal, lived experience of the problems with crime and policing in Sussex and a passion and energy for reform.

As a mixed-race woman, who has lived both in rural Sussex villages and big cities, I have seen all too often how inequality in our criminal justice system affects people who fall outside the demographic majority.

I’ll bring the perspective of a warm, listening, human face, not a career politician.

I currently work in a school, supporting the learning and development of children on the autism spectrum and worked extensively as a freelance journalist before moving to education.

I’m committed to meeting with Sussex communities every day and bringing your voice into decision-making.

What is it that a commissioner can do that a Police and Crime Panel can’t – and does the extra cost incurred by the office of the PCC provide value for money?

In short, nothing and no. Greens believe that the role of PCC should be abolished, returning oversight and accountability to locally elected councillors via a panel and leaving operational policing to the experts.

The PCC posts have been a costly failure with low election turnouts and limited public accountability.

While I would use my term of office to address the fundamental reforms needed to our policing, I would also work for the position itself to be abolished.

Should PCCs serve only two terms, like American presidents? What grounds are there for serving more than two terms as PCC?

The position of PCC should be scrapped completely, with oversight and accountability given to a politically balanced panel of elected local councillors.

But while the post exists, there definitely should be term limits. The role is there to serve the needs of the people of Sussex, not to provide a cosy job for a career politician.

What would you say to those migrants, refugees and people from black, Asian and other ethnic minority communities who are wary of the police? How would you respond to concerns that stop and search affects some communities disproportionately?

As a mixed-race woman myself, I’d say that I understand your wariness and that reform is needed to build trust between the police and communities who suffer structural – and overt – racism.

I recently challenged the current PCC directly at the Sussex Police and Crime Panel over the fact that black people are 10 times more likely to be stopped and searched than white people in Sussex.

Outrageously, Ms Bourne claimed that this is “proportionate” and denied that the practice is discriminatory. I couldn’t disagree more strongly.

Vigils for Sarah Everard and protests by Extinction Rebellion and the Black Lives Matter movement have ended with riot police dragging people away while the English Defence League and other far-right groups are handled with kid gloves. How would you balance responses to different protests?

I very much recognise the unequal treatment you describe. I’ve found it deeply upsetting and unacceptable. Everyone should be treated equally before the law.

An aggressive approach to peaceful protesters for equality, human rights and the planet, while not pursuing clear cases of hate crime, is not the policing that we need.

My focus would be on safely facilitating lawful protest and protecting public safety and human rights.

Finally, the right to protest is a cornerstone of our democracy.

The government’s attempts to silence dissent using the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill is a disgrace. It must be resisted.

How will you ensure that women and girls are safe from male violence and abuse in their schools, on the streets and in their homes?

Misogynistic hate crimes have risen sharply across the county in recent years, yet conviction rates remain shockingly low.

I would work with partners to:

  • Treat misogyny as a hate crime
  • Invest in specialist officers and further training for all officers to deal with domestic violence and misogynistic hate crimes
  • Put funding for rape crisis centre services on a sustainable footing
  • Support interventions with young men to tackle entrenched misogynistic attitudes – we need to move the focus on to challenging male violence rather than telling women “not to provoke it”

In addition, I will put in place measures to further support gender parity within the force itself. Recent figures indicate that less than a third of Sussex Police officers are women, falling to less than one fifth at inspector level.

How will you work with Sussex Police to learn from cases like Shana Grice’s murder, making sure officers are trained and women are taken seriously when they report crimes?

This was a shocking case, and my heart goes out to Ms Grice’s family and friends. The police repeatedly got it wrong.

Stalking and violence against women are incredibly common and women are being failed.

Sussex Police recorded 2,020 stalking incidents in the year to March 2020 yet – during 2020 – only 29 stalking protection orders were issued.

Regular training and an assumption that victims should be taken seriously are clearly needed.

We also need to address gender imbalance within Sussex Police. While it’s great that three of the very top ranks are held by women, there are twice as many men as women in the force as a whole and – at inspector level – men outnumber women by four to one.

How do we get the police to work with councils, to patrol where and at the times we want them to?

This is one reason that the post of PCC should go and greater oversight by Sussex councillors should return.

In the meantime, Sussex’s community safety partnerships are critical to ensuring this local join up.

As PCC, I’ll be actively seeking out conversations with residents across Sussex to understand those neighbourhood priorities and encouraging a hands-on listening approach across the force.

How do you think Sussex Police can balance the policing needs of its busy urban areas without neglecting country villages?

It’s about getting smarter, more targeted and fairer.

We need to stop wasting police time on disproportionate stop and searches of young black men or on people found in possession of very small amounts of soft drugs and employ more responsive rural crime specialists, for example.

But this is partly about demanding a bigger pie than simply dividing up the existing one.

Another four years with a Tory PCC, unwilling to stand up against Tory government cuts, isn’t going to deliver that. I’ll fight for the resourcing for Sussex that we really need.

How committed are you to ensuring that the police enforce the 2004 Hunting Act?

I’m very committed. There is no excuse for those who would flout the law in order to barbarically abuse wild animals.

How will you tackle drug-related crime?

The evidence is clear that the criminalisation of the drug trade does little to address the harms of abuse, directs major profits to violent organised criminal gangs, drains significant police resources and leaves significant numbers of casual users with a criminal record that harms their life chances.

The Green Party believes in a legalised and regulated system.

As PCC, I would seek to explore how we can direct resources towards tackling the violent and exploitative practices of organised crime (such as county lines) and focus on treating the harm done by drugs to some users as a public health issue.

For more information

Website: kahinabouhassane.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/kahinasbouhassane
Twitter: @KBouhassane
Instagram: @kahinabouhassane

Katy Bourne (Conservative)

Katy Bourne, Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner Conservative candidate

Why do you want to be the police and crime commissioner for Sussex?

What will you bring to the role?

Having served as Sussex police and crime commissioner since 2012, I have the experience and proven track record to continue making a difference to policing our county.

As PCC, I have:

  • robustly held the police to account on behalf of residents, successfully supported victims of crime and invested heavily in frontline policing.
  • driven the biggest rise in police officer numbers, with more frontline officers now in the force than when I was re-elected in 2016. Sussex Police has now restored neighbourhood policing and recruited even more PCSOs.
  • established a ground-breaking, early-intervention scheme called Reboot for 11 to 17-year-olds which has dealt with over 1,000 young people – and 82 per cent have not re-offended since.
  • delivered on rural and business community crime concerns with a dedicated rural crime team and a Sussex Safer Business Partnership.
  • reduced the non-emergency 101 call waiting times by 75 per cent.
  • ensured Sussex Police treat road safety and anti-social behaviour seriously.
  • directed millions of pounds to support all victims of crime, divert young people from harm and helped communities protect themselves, especially women and girls.

My six-point plan – more police, safer streets

  • Continue to cut crime, catch more criminals, fight drugs gangs, county lines and serious violence and reduce reoffending – making everyone safer in Sussex
  • Further recruitment of officers and PCSOs to increase frontline policing and make it more visible
  • More action on rural crime, including continued investment into our rural crime team and expansion of the “DISC” app reporting pilot for farmers and rural businesses
  • Investment in roads policing to tackle anti-social driving and speeding
  • Make shops and businesses safer places to work by establishing a dedicated business crime team within Sussex Police
  • Support victims of crime, especially our elderly and young, and protect our most vulnerable from all forms of abuse

What is it that a commissioner can do that a Police and Crime Panel can’t – and does the extra cost incurred by the office of the PCC provide value for money?

I’m not sure if you mean the old Police Authority (which the PCC role replaced in 2012) or the Police and Crime Panels that now exist whose role it is to scrutinise the PCC’s decisions and be a “critical friend”?

In either case, a PCC can provide swifter decision-making and true accountability to local people. PCCs are elected on a manifesto that is tested by the electorate. Police authorities were largely invisible to the public and the public rarely engaged with them.

PCC offices remain small by comparison to departments within local authorities.

PCCs have many more statutory duties and responsibilities than police authorities ever had.

Some PCCs, like me, have secured millions of pounds of additional funding for policing, for prevention and diversionary activities and for community safety programmes.

As PCC for Sussex, I have built a model of commissioning services for victims that has been used across the country and is considered by the Ministry of Justice to be good practice.

As PCC, I am not interested in long committee meetings and drawn-out debates, which was the hallmark of the previous police authority system. I want to address problems now and make a real difference.

Over the past eight years, I have engaged with hundreds of thousands of people and ensured their concerns and ideas have been listened to and acted on by Sussex Police.

For example, I established the award-winning youth commission to listen to the voices of our young people, the country’s first ever elders commission so that the opinions of our older generation would be counted and the Safer Sussex Business Partnership to improve the response to crime within our business community.

Domestic abuse was not a high priority for the force: within two years, I had ensured the force achieved “white ribbon” status.

Knife crime stats were suspiciously low – I challenged that and got under the bonnet of force crime recording. The same goes for stalking.

There is also now one of the largest dedicated rural crime police teams in the south east.

Should PCCs serve only two terms, like American presidents? What grounds are there for serving more than two terms as PCC?

The two roles are not in the slightest bit comparable. The public should decide whether they deem an incumbent PCC worthy of re-electing for a further term.

In the UK, many local councillors and MPs have been re-elected many times over because their constituents trust them to represent them effectively and fairly.

What would you say to those migrants, refugees and people from black, Asian and other ethnic minority communities who are wary of the police? How would you respond to concerns that stop and search affects some communities disproportionately?

I have absolute confidence in our Chief Constable Jo Shiner and her top team of mostly senior female officers to provide policing for Sussex residents that is rooted in public consent and delivered without fear or favour.

As PCC, I have extensively scrutinised Sussex Police’s stop and search approach and its impact over the past year, and I can find no evidence of any institutional bias or structural racism.

That is not to say that all ethnic minority communities have 100 per cent confidence in the police here or in any other part of the UK which is why, if re-elected, I will continue to closely scrutinise and monitor this area of policing.

It is true that, in order to police effectively and maintain public consent, all police forces must reflect the communities they police.

Sussex Police is no different and they are trying very hard to recruit from more diverse communities to increase participation and confidence.

The most recent detective intake showed Sussex was well ahead of the national average for BAME applicants.

Vigils for Sarah Everard and protests by Extinction Rebellion and the Black Lives Matter movement have ended with riot police dragging people away while the English Defence League and other far-right groups are handled with kid gloves. How would you balance responses to different protests?

That’s not been the case in Sussex, and the recent police watchdog HMICFRS’s (Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services) detailed report into the policing of the vigils clearly showed that politicians and commentators had been far too quick to judge the police based on what others had already said and based on selectively edited video clips.

Protests are an important part of our democracy. Under human rights law, we all have the right to gather and express our views but these rights are not absolute rights.

I absolutely support the right to protest. I don’t support the right to destroy property or intimidate local residents or to bring normal business to a standstill.

How will you ensure that women and girls are safe from male violence and abuse in their schools, on the streets and in their homes?

Firstly, let’s not accept the generalisation that all men are violent predators.

Not all men harass women in public spaces and the vast majority of our fathers, brothers, husbands and sons want their female relations and friends to be able to walk the streets without fear or intimidation.

Sussex Police were praised by the Home Secretary and peer forces for the way they reached out to domestic abuse victims during the pandemic.

They are quite rightly also recognised for their endeavours to tackle stalking with the highest per-capita deployment of stalking protection orders in the country.

As PCC, I am working with our local women and girls’ service providers and we have already developed the first ever, pan-Sussex framework for how these services should be delivered.

If re-elected, I intend to provide more preventative measures to address this issue, for example, teaching young people in educational establishments about healthy, positive relationships and also developing the ground-breaking perpetrator programmes I have already introduced that effectively tackle the perpetrator’s behaviour.

I will also continue directing significant funding into domestic and serious sexual abuse services. This year alone, I have successfully secured £3.4 million of government funding for our Sussex-based organisations and victims.

How will you work with Sussex Police to learn from cases like Shana Grice’s murder, making sure officers are trained and women are taken seriously when they report crimes.

The tragic circumstances surrounding Ms Grice’s murder will be the reminder for us all that stalking is an insidious crime which must never be overlooked.

I commissioned Sussex’s first specialist stalking advocacy service who work with hundreds of victims and ensured that all Sussex Police officers receive training to recognise and understand stalking.

As the PCC, I have also worked hard with Sussex Police so they are now recognised nationally as the leading force in this area but there is always more to do.

I am currently the national stalking lead on behalf of all PCCs and, if re-elected, I will continue to work with chief constables, government ministers and women’s organisations to develop a better response from police forces nationally so all victims feel confident to report.

How do we get the police to work with councils, to patrol where and at the times we want them to?

We already have community safety partnerships and city partnerships bringing together local councillors, police, health, education, housing and other relevant organisations where local concerns can be discussed and analysed.

The operational deployment of police resources must always remain at the sole discretion of police commanders and, ultimately, the Chief Constable as set out in law.

However, my regular and extensive engagement with parish, district, borough, city and county councillors does help provide a detailed picture of the crime and anti-social hotspots that flare up and helps inform a proportionate, local policing response.

How do you think Sussex Police can balance the policing needs of its busy urban areas without neglecting country villages?

Sussex Police have transformed their policing of rural and more isolated communities with the introduction of the largest, dedicated rural policing team in the south east.

This has been enthusiastically welcomed by landowners, farmers and residents, and it has already secured notable successes in recovering stolen agricultural machinery, solving heritage crimes and investigating dog thefts and reuniting stolen pets with their worried owners.

If re-elected, I will continue investment in this area to keep our rural places safe.

How committed are you to ensuring that the police enforce the 2004 Hunting Act?

Police have to enforce the laws that Parliament passes and I will continue to scrutinise and hold them to account if re-elected as PCC.

How will you tackle drug-related crime?

There are more police officers and more police staff available to tackle drug-related crime at every level – from cannabis farms to county lines runners and the major crime gangs who are behind importation and distribution.

We need to remind the casual drug user about the misery trail behind their weekend joint, their pills and lines of coke.

We need to prosecute people for drink and drug driving.

We need to educate and support young people who see drug dealing as an easy win to cash and status.

We also need to take a health and prevention approach as we are with Project Adder in Hastings, but we also need to make our towns and villages and our road networks no-go areas for drug dealing.

The new police enforcement units that have been funded by extra precept investment will make criminals think twice about using the roads for distribution – and major joint operations with the National Crime Agency and Border Force are making sure our ports and airports are constantly alert to larger shipments.

For more information


Website: www.katybourne.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/KatyBournetheSussexPCC
Twitter: @katybourne

Paul Richards (Labour and Co-operative candidate)

Paul Richards Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner Labour candidate

Why do you want to be the police and crime commissioner for Sussex?

People across Sussex, from Crawley to Chichester, from Brighton to Bexhill, are telling me it is time for a change.

After a decade of the Conservatives, crime in Sussex is up and police numbers are down.

People are looking anew at Keir Starmer’s Labour Party and seeing that Labour is back as the party of justice, security, law and order.

What will you bring to the role?

My priorities

  1. More neighbourhood policing at the heart of our community, reflecting local concerns, listening to local voices, preventing crime and anti-social behaviour.
  2. More support for victims of crime and for witnesses. With the Tory courts backlog, the danger is that cases will not come to court for years and victims will not bring prosecutions.
  3. More investment in preventative services like boxing clubs and sports facilities, like the BMX track I visited in Sidley, Bexhill, the other day.

What is it that a commissioner can do that a Police and Crime Panel can’t – and does the extra cost incurred by the office of the PCC provide value for money?

The role provides some visibility and accountability in ways a committee doesn’t but until we get higher turnouts, the role will lack legitimacy.

I believe the current set-up is wasteful. For a start, I would donate half of my salary as police and crime commissioner to police and victims’ charities and cut down on central expenses.

Should PCCs serve only two terms, like American presidents? What grounds are there for serving more than two terms as PCC?

Yes, there should be a two-term limit. This should not be a job for life but, instead, be the chance to serve your community.

If you can’t achieve what you want in eight years, you probably aren’t going to.

What would you say to those migrants, refugees and people from black, Asian and other ethnic minority communities who are wary of the police? How would you respond to concerns that stop and search affects some communities disproportionately?

There is a huge job to be done to build trust and confidence between Sussex police and people of colour, ethnic minorities, and other marginalised communities like migrants and refugees.

We need to rebuild trust with the LGBTQ-plus community and with women after the Shana Grice case.

Trust can only be built painstakingly but it starts with police training and procedures.

I will look at the results of the pilot scheme in Sussex for the use of serious violence reduction orders (SVRO) to tackle knife crime.

If “stop and search” is disproportionately affecting one ethnic group (which it is), then we must look at it again.

The Sussex Police stop and search scrutiny panel must be allowed full access to the figures and its recommendations must be taken seriously.

Vigils for Sarah Everard and protests by Extinction Rebellion and the Black Lives Matter movement have ended with riot police dragging people away while the English Defence League and other far-right groups are handled with kid gloves. How would you balance responses to different protests?

The right to protest peacefully is enshrined in our law but it must never be abused by fascists or racists who make our streets unsafe.

The police need to police demonstrations with greater sensitivity if it is clear public safety is not under threat, such as the recent vigils in Brighton, Shoreham and elsewhere.

But there’s zero excuse for abusing or attacking the police.

How will you ensure that women and girls are safe from male violence and abuse in their schools, on the streets and in their homes?

I would start with male culture, attitudes, language and actions – and a robust programme of education and explanation about what is and isn’t appropriate.

I would ensure all police are trained to take women’s complaints seriously.

I welcome that police forces are recording crimes motivated by sex or gender, in effect making misogyny a hate crime.

We need more police on the streets, for example, along Brighton seafront, where women are routinely harassed, and use the full power of the law to prosecute offenders.

How will you work with Sussex Police to learn from cases like Shana Grice’s murder, making sure officers are trained and women are taken seriously when they report crimes?

The murder of Shana Grice is such a terrible tragedy and raises such important issues about how women are treated within the criminal justice system.

I would start with the recruitment process, initial police training, ongoing professional development and, at every stage, train men how to deal with women’s concerns.

I would push for more women officers to be recruited and end the old-fashioned canteen culture where it still lingers.

How do we get the police to work with councils, to patrol where and at the times people want them to?

My concept of neighbourhood policing includes local crime prevention agreements between local communities and neighbourhood teams, agreeing priorities, and a service-level agreement on visible policing.

How do you think Sussex Police can balance the policing needs of its busy urban areas without neglecting country villages?

I am concerned about rising rural crime, including theft of agricultural equipment, damage to property and illegal blood sports.

The key is my plan to put more police on the beat, including in Sussex villages and rural areas.

How committed are you to ensuring that the police enforce the 2004 Hunting Act?

I am 100 per cent committed to Sussex Police enforcing the 2004 Hunting Act, introduced by the Labour government, which bans the hunting of foxes, deer, hares and mink with dogs.

There is no excuse for blood sports and no place for it in our rural communities.

I have nothing against the spectacle of local hunts. The law allows drag hunting. Nor am I opposed to shooting or angling.

How will you tackle drug-related crime?

I favour a public health approach to addiction and treatment, helping people avoid drugs or beat their addiction to drugs.

The criminal justice system should be focused on the organised crime gangs profiteering from drugs, not those whose lives are ruined by them. Sussex Police must continue to focus on disrupting county lines and protecting young people.

More police, closer to our communities, more support for victims and witnesses, more investment in youth services and sports. That’s the difference a Labour and Co-op police and crime commissioner will make.

For more information


Website: labourinsussex.org.uk
Twitter: @labourpaul

Roy Williams (Independent)

Flyer attached to lamppost in Crowborough

Independent candidate Roy Williams is a retired former Metropolitan Police inspector who describes himself as an English constitutionalist.

He declined to answer the questions.

Mr Williams said:

I have no faith in the mainstream media [MSM] / fake news and will be having interviews with alternative media outlets and will be producing some of my own videos which I will post on my Facebook page over time.

I consider the MSM with all of its ongoing censorship and propaganda to be a part of the problem and will not be engaging with you.

Roy Williams – Independent candidate for Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner

In a post on his Facebook page, Mr Williams responded to one of the questions put forward by the public about policing protests.

For more information


Website: royforsussexpcc.godaddysites.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/roytheboyx


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